Windows can not reliably remember your default audio output device. Whenever a “new” audio device is connected, Windows automatically switches to that device instead. Not “new” as in first time the audio device is seen on your system, but “new” as in every damn time it is “plugged in” – for example when you power off a HDMI-connected display and then turn it back on again.

There is no way to disable this “feature”, the oldest occurences of people desperately trying to find a solution are about eight years old. There is tons of threads all over the internet about this insane behavior. It even happens when updating your GPU drivers, as that makes those HDMI ports “new” to Windows as well for some fucking reason.

Especially frustrating is how even on Microsofts own support forums, the helpers can’t even understand the problem without being told multiple times, in every single thread about it.

But what can you expect from an operating system that ships the above-pictured system preferences UI mashup and thinks anything about that is even remotely acceptable or normal. (In case you are blissfully unaware: The window on the right is what you get when you click “Advanced” somewhere in the window on the left. The window on the left is the new UI, but half the system still uses the old Windows XP era style UI, because… well, no idea why. Some settings can be changed in both parts of the preferences, some only in one of them. Absolutely bonkers.)

The “solution”, in classic Windows style, is to hack something together yourself with AHK and a 3rd party tool that feels like it time travelled to my aid from the 90s. I’m glad I’ll be able to automate it somewhat, but just look at that website. Look at the first two options in the usage examples. OPEN CD-ROM DRIVE! That kind of tool is what you need for setting your default audio device reliably on Windows 10.

With “Show Apple Music” disabled, two of the three sections in Music.app are filled with almost nothing but Apple Music. Sure, Radio might be free, but it’s still Apple Music. To quote a great Westerosian thinker, “I don’t want it”. I want my own music. Nothing else. There used to be a way to remove Radio via parental controls, but even this hack seems to have been removed since at least iOS13. The categories in the third screenshot are all 100% Apple Music, nothing in there is coming from my local music library.

I’m using the iOS Bedtime feature for years now. With yesterday’s iOS 14 update the feature got moved from the Clock app to the Health app. Unfortunately the migration is done by disabling your existing alarm and showing a button to open the Health app to set it up again.

I woke up late and well rested today.

I use a bunch of JetBrains products across multiple machines (RubyMine, GoLand, DataGrip) with the fantastic One Dark theme. Every time I update any of them — without exception — it breaks and I have to manually navigate into the settings and change the editor theme back to “One Dark”. This happens across all computers and products for more than a year now.

Not being able to clean things up in my profiles because someone else is messing up their data somehow is one of my biggest pet peeves.

The “MiniPlayer” (no spaces, according to the Music.app) showcases the attention to detail we are used to from the Music.app:

  • “Next” button is cut off by default
  • There’s a button to switch to the “MiniPlayer” from the normal view but there’s no way to switch back. Solution is to do it through “Window / Switch from MiniPlayer” or memorize Shift + Cmd + M

Cool sorting, Music.app! I inspected the tags with YATE and they are fine, there is no reason for this to happen. Sorting by track number directly works as intended. Good stuff.

It’s nice when service providers offer you a way to export your data. It would be even nicer if it’s useful data.